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Watershed Protection

Federal Fiscal Year 2016 Section 319 Project Applications and Awards

 


 

The Nonpoint Source Task Force met Dec. 8, 2015, in the Matthew Training Center at the Joe Foss Building, 523 E. Capitol Ave. in Pierre.

 

The Task Force reviewed the following 319 applications. The Task Force's recommendations were then considered by the Board of Water and Natural Resources at its January 2016 meeting. The Board's recommendations were then be reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before grant funds were awarded. Links below take you to project summaries. Links from the project summaries will take you to the project's funding application in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format.

 

To return to the current year's applications, click here.

 

Projects that received funding

Belle Fourche River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7 (Amendment)

Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7

South Dakota Nonpoint Source Information and Education Project - Segment 4 (Amendment)

South Central Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 1

Persistence of E. Coli in Stream Sediments and the Impact on Water Quality

 

Projects that did not receive funding

Examining Seasonal Fluctuations in the Pathogenicity Potential of the Big Sioux River and Skunk Creek

 

Belle Fourche River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7 (Amendment)

 

319 Grant Request: $400,000                    Awarded: $400,000            

 

The Belle Fourche River Watershed Partnership is the project sponsor for this two-year project. This is the seventh segment of seven planned project segments that address a cluster of seven total maximum daily loads. Completion of the activities planned for this segment will begin implementing best management practices that reduce E. coli and advance the best management practices implementation for total suspended solid pollutants to 73 percent complete. These best management practices include: (1) installing irrigation sprinkler systems, (2) implementing grazing management systems, (3) installing riparian vegetation improvements, (4) clean water diversion, and (5) relocating livestock feeding grounds.  For more...

 

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Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7

 

319 Grant Request: $511,863                    Awarded: $200,000

 

This project segment is a continuation program. The goal of this project is to improve water quality entering the Big Sioux River and Lakes Kampeska and Pelican by reducing nutrient and sediment loads originating from grazing and animal feeding operations, from crop ground and pasture lands caused by inappropriate application of manure or holding pond water, and from stream/river banks and lake shoreline erosion.  For more...

 

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South Dakota Nonpoint Source Information and Education Project - Segment 4 (Amendment)

 

319 Grant Request: $86,700                    Awarded: $86,700

 

The South Dakota Nonpoint Source Information and Education Project is designed to continue providing South Dakota’s citizens information and education opportunities about nonpoint source pollution to in order to gain their support for, and participation in, nonpoint source pollution prevention and reduction practices. To achieve the goal, this project will focus on outreach to South Dakota’s adults using a combination of traditional and innovative methods, support of local and regional activities through a competitive mini-grants program, and increase teacher, student and adult awareness of watersheds and watershed protection.  For more...

 

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South Central Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 1

 

319 Grant Request: $1,550,000                   Awarded $931,335

 

The goal of the South Central Watershed Implementation Project is to restore or protect the beneficial uses in the Lower James River Watershed, Lewis and Clark Lake, and the watersheds of Geddes, Academy, Platte Lake and Lake Andes Lake. This will be accomplished through the installation of best management practices (BMPs) in the watersheds that target sources of sediment, nutrients and fecal coliform bacteria. This project, Segment I, will address and target BMP installation in the entire South Dakota portion of the Lewis and Clark Lake Watershed (1.9 million acres) and the Lower James River Watershed and its tributaries (2.6 million acres). It will also provide technical and financial assistance to the watershed activities in the Lake Andes, Geddes, Academy and Platte Lake Watersheds. These additional four watersheds add up to 560,000 additional acres and are tributaries of the Missouri River and Lake Francis Case,which lies upriver and borders the Lewis and Clark Lake Watershed. The total project area acreage is 5,053,800 acres.  For more...

 

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Persistence of E. Coli in Stream Sediments and the Impact on Water Quality

 

319 Grant Request: $188,965                    Awarded: $188,965

 

This project will use a combination of literature review and spatial sampling to determine a standard method for sampling E. coli in stream sediments. Using the standard method, the project will also assess the stability of E. coli concentrations over time including the impact of stormflow, shear-stress and sediment particle sizes. Stormflows have the potential to deplete sediment stores of E. coli; therefore, this project will also evaluate the potential for E. coli recovery after such events. Outcomes from the project will provide broad insight into the risks to South Dakota waterbodies from existing in-stream E. coli stores and the potential persistence of the risks from E. coli stores over time.  For more...

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Examining Seasonal Fluctuations in the Pathogenicity Potential of the Big Sioux River and Skunk Creek

 

319 Grant Request: $100,000                    Awarded: $0

 

This project will help guide future best management practices and measure the pathogenic potential of the bacterial contamination of six sites along the Big Sioux River and Skunk Creek biweekly for the period of one year. Although fecal coliforms and E. coli are commonly quantified in the monitoring of our water systems by local, state and federal agencies, the level of pathogenicity is often overlooked. We propose to apply our newly developed monitoring metric for the pathogenic potential of the contaminated water by screening the bacteria for harmful traits that can be passed even among harmless bacteria, creating the possibility for severe public health risks. Through this work, we will determine the effects of seasonal change and major weather events on the human disease potential, and help guide usage of the waterways.  For more...

 

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