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Watershed Protection

Federal Fiscal Year 2015 Section 319 Project Applications and Awards

 


 

The Nonpoint Source Task Force met Dec. 9, 2014, in the Matthew Training Center at the Joe Foss Building, 523 E. Capitol Ave. in Pierre.

 

The Task Force reviewed the following 319 applications. The Task Force's recommendations were then considered by the Board of Water and Natural Resources at its January 2015 meeting. The Board's recommendations were then be reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency before grant funds were awarded. Links below take you to project summaries. Links from the project summaries will take you to the project's funding application in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format.

 

To return to the current year's applications, click here.

 

Projects that received funding

Belle Fourche River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7

Big Sioux River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 3

Grassland Management & Planning Segment 4 - Amendment

Lewis & Clark Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 4 Amendment

Spring Creek Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 3

 

Projects that did not receive funding

Examining the Pathogenicity of the Microbial Profile in Rapid and Spring Creek

 

Belle Fourche River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 7

 

319 Grant Request: $1,135,000       Awarded: $793,000

 

The Belle Fourche River Watershed Partnership is the project sponsor for this two-year project. This is the seventh segment of seven planned project segments that address a cluster of seven total maximum daily loads. Completion of the activities planned for this segment will begin implementing best management practices that reduce E. coli and advance the best management practices implementation for total suspended solid pollutants to 73 percent complete. These best management practices include: (1) installing irrigation sprinkler systems, (2) implementing grazing management systems, (3) installing riparian vegetation improvements, (4) clean water diversion, and (5) relocating livestock feeding grounds. For more...

 

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Big Sioux River Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 3

 

319 Grant Request: $600,000       Awarded: $500,000

 

The Big Sioux River Watershed Project is a 10-year total maximum daily load implementation strategy that will be completed in multiple segments and parts. The project will restore and/or maintain the water quality of the Big Sioux River and its tributaries to meet the designated beneficial uses. The Lower Big Sioux River, Central Big Sioux River and the North-Central Big Sioux River/Oakwood Lakes Watershed Assessments identified various segments of the Big Sioux River and certain tributaries between the Brookings/Hamlin County line and Sioux City, Iowa as failing to meet designated uses due to impairments from total suspended solids, dissolved oxygen and/or bacteria. The current project (Segment 3) is focused on further reducing loadings from animal feeding operations, overland sediment transport and expand ongoing past project activities (Segment 1 and Segment 2). It also extends water quality monitoring through 2018. For more...

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Grassland Management & Planning Segment 4 - Amendment

 

319 Grant Request: $462,077       Awarded: $179,000

 

This project segment will continue the South Dakota Grassland Coalition’s (SDGLC) leadership in providing South Dakota livestock producers with practices that reduce nonpoint source (NPS) pollution from grasslands and promote sustainable agricultural. The goals will be attained by providing technical assistance to grassland managers for the planning and implementation of grassland management systems, the completion of an information and education program on grassland management, a GIS layer of remaining native grasslands of South Dakota, and watershed modeling of “what if” scenarios of grassland-to-cropland conversion in hopes of identifying and applying grassland protection in key areas of the state. For more...

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Lewis & Clark Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 4 Amendment

 

319 Grant Request: $400,000       Awarded: $300,000

 

This proposal is the fourth segment of a locally-planned multi-year (10-15 year) effort to implement best management practices in the Lewis and Clark Lake watershed, Lake Andes, Geddes, Academy and Platte Lake watersheds. This effort is aimed at restoring water quality to meet designated beneficial uses and address total maximum daily loads established, and to be established, for waterbodies in these watersheds. For more...

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Spring Creek Watershed Implementation Project - Segment 3

 

319 Grant Request: $215,000       Awarded: $115,000

 

Pennington County is the project sponsor for this two-year project. This is the third of six planned segments. This project will continue implementation of the best management practices identified in the total maximum daily load reports for the Spring Creek Watershed, the Stormwater Management Plan and On-site Wastewater Management Plan. Completion of the activities planned for this segment will advance the best management practices implementation for fecal coliform bacteria, E. coli, and total suspended solids. These best management practices include management of riparian zones, stormwater, forestry, grazing, lake improvement, and on-site wastewater treatment systems. For more...

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Examining the Pathogenicity of the Microbial Profile in Rapid Creek and Spring Creek

 

319 Grant Request: $156,849       Awarded: $0

 

This project will help guide future best management practices, establish a temporal baseline of pathogenic potential of the bacterial profiles of Rapid Creek and Spring Creek and link these estimates with total suspended solids. Although fecal coliforms and E. coli are commonly quantified in the monitoring of water systems by local, state and federal agencies, the level of pathogenicity is often overlooked. The project will work to create a new monitoring metric for pathogenic potential of the contaminated water by screening the bacteria for harmful traits that can be passed even among harmless bacteria, creating the possibility for severe public health risks. For more...

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